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5 Great Scary Movies You Can Stream Tonight

5 Great Scary Movies You Can Stream Tonight

Instead of settling for the same run-of-the-mill slasher flicks this Halloween, why not opt for a scary movie that's legitimately creepy — or better yet, critically acclaimed?

We asked Stephen Farber, the president of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, to tell us about five of his favorite frightening flicks that are currently streaming online. From demonic thrillers to blood-caked classics, Farber has narrowed down the best of the genre, guaranteeing a fright-filled Halloween night for anyone who enjoys a good thrill.

READ: 5 Great Romantic Movies You Can Stream Tonight

So don't waste your time flipping through the TV listings this Halloween. Instead, stream one of these classic films and prepare to be scared. 

(Associated Press)
Dracula (1931)


Farber says:

"Dracula" is the grand-daddy of all vampire movies; without it, there would be no "Twilight."  Bram Stoker created the story of the famous “undead” count in the late 19th century, but this film version directed by Tod Browning helped to establish the commercial viability of the horror genre.  Bela Lugosi’s portrayal of the seductive but sinister vampire retains its appeal, and the cast of victims, confederates and adversaries also helps to keep this movie as immortal as the blood-hungry “children of the night.”

Available instantly on Netflix (price based on subscription) and for rental on Amazon Instant Video ($2.99)

(Associated Press)
Psycho (1960)


Farber says:

"Psycho" was chosen by the American Film Institute as the scariest movie of all time.  Viewers seeing it for the first time today may have a bit of trouble imagining the impact it had on audiences in 1960.  The famous shower scene looks discreet by today’s standards of screen violence, but it was shocking in its time.  The true brilliance of the film lay in director Alfred Hitchcock’s decision to kill off the main character (Janet Leigh) one-third of the way through the movie.  That had never been done before, and it heightened the suspense of the remainder of the film.  Anthony Perkins contributed a classic performance as the shy, psychotic Norman Bates.

Available for rental on Amazon Instant Video ($1.99)

The Haunting (1963)


Farber says:

"The Haunting" may be the most subtle and atmospheric of all haunted-house movies.  There’s little overt violence in this film, but it casts a menacing spell.  Director Robert Wise, a two-time Academy Award winner, had started out making low-budget horror movies in the 1940s, and he returned to the genre with refined skills.  The old New England mansion that creaks and threatens the four people who move in to investigate paranormal phenomena is masterfully rendered by Wise, his cinematographer and set designer.  The excellent cast includes Julie Harris (in perhaps her greatest screen performance), Claire Bloom, Richard Johnson and Russ Tamblyn.

Available for rental on Amazon Instant Video ($2.99), or for free with an Amazon Prime membership.

(Associated Press)
Rosemary's Baby (1968)


Farber says:

"Rosemary’s Baby" was the first American movie directed by Roman Polanski, and it established him as a powerful force in Hollywood.  Ira Levin’s novel about the banality of evil in present-day Manhattan provided a perfect springboard for Polanski’s diabolical talents.  The witches hatching a plot to bring the Devil’s child to earth seem at first to be a comical band of codgers, but they grow more chilling as the film continues.  Ruth Gordon won an Oscar as the intrusive leader of the coven, but the film develops its emotion from the delicate performance of Mia Farrow as the unsuspecting young woman raped by Satan.

Available for rental on Amazon Instant Video ($2.99)

(Reuters)
Carrie (1976)


Farber says:

In most horror movies the heroine is a victim, but in this adaptation of Stephen King’s novel, she’s also a deadly threat to the other characters.  King created a brilliant allegory about the instability of adolescence, and director Brian De Palma brought wit as well as lyricism and terror to his adaptation of the tale.  Carrie’s telekinetic powers are unleashed by the bullying of her fellow students, a theme that takes on added relevance today.  Sissy Spacek, Piper Laurie and a newcomer named John Travolta all contribute expert performances.  And the movie’s final shot may be the most frightening ending in cinematic history.

Available for rental on Amazon Instant Video ($2.99)

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